Tag Archives: pc games

The Evolution of Gaming PCs [MicroGraphic]

No one pushes a harmless CPU and graphics card to the very brink quite like a serious gamer. It’s a point of pride with many players that their gaming system can skillfully walk the line between bleeding-edge game play and suddenly melting processors. (It’s one thing to have an advanced cooling system, but it’s something else completely when you feel compelled to keep a fire extinguisher close at hand.)

Gamers can go to extreme lengths just to squeak out a better refresh rate or a few more frames per second, and they’re quick to take advantage of the latest technology as it is released. Over the last 30 years there have been some significant advances in CPU and graphics technology and an occasional plateau as well. Together the gaming industry and gamers have pushed the evolution of the common CPU and associated graphics cards to the point that it’s hard to believe how far we’ve really come.

Evolution of Gaming PC's

The Genesis of Gaming PCs

The Commodore 64 was introduced in January 1982 with a CPU that clocked in at 1.024 megahertz and featured a wholesome 64 kilobytes of RAM. The 16 colors on the 320×200 display definitely don’t seem like much today, but it was enough to play the likes of Q*Bert, Pole Position, and Dig Dug. The games were simplistic but fun, and 30 years later we still talk about them and play them on a variety of systems. These specs seem miniscule by today’s standards, but they were enough to make the Commodore 64 the best-selling single personal computer model of all time.

For the next decade, things really didn’t get that much faster. Intel began to release the X86 series throughout the 80s and early 90s, which made some strides and created an environment where games like SimCity and Doom could start changing the way we thought about games. We now had enough power in these computers to start creating an immersive experience. These games would set the tone for the industry for the next twenty years.

Major CPU Advances

The Pentium Pro started to really increase the performance of the average gaming computer, and we saw these CPUs start to clock much higher speeds. Between ‘95 and ‘99 we saw a consistent growth in processor speeds, but it was in 2000, with the launch of the Pentium 4 and AMDK7 that we started to see some major advances in capabilities.

In the gaming world games like Doom led to Quake, Unreal, and Half-Life, and real time strategy games began to take off. We had the power to manage millions of polygons for a complete first-person experience and well-balanced and addictive games like StarCraft began to make competitive (and professional) gaming possible.

Jumps and Plateaus in Gaming Pc’s

Between 2000 and 2004 there was a major jump in technology, and the Pentium 4 nearly doubled its speed from 1.5 GHz to 3.06 GHz (on average). This happened in time for the push toward online gaming and MMORPGs like World of Warcraft as well as some new developments in the FPS world. Serious gamers could really push the graphics and frame rates of their PCs to get an edge on their competition, and huge guilds of virtual adventurers could raid a massive dungeon without experiencing undue amounts of lag.

Once we hit this point, though, the actual clocked speeds of these processors hit a plateau for a while. This wasn’t because there weren’t any advances in technology, it’s just that the CPUs had changed their focus to dual and quad core processing. Of course, this didn’t stop serious gamers from overclocking their new Core i7 and pushing it to a nice, warm 4.2 GHz to really enhance their Modern Warfare 3 experience.

An open question to gamer out here, which graphics card and processor do you prefer for your gaming Pcs?

Give special 3D textures to PS1 games Using ePSXe Shaders

ePSXe is an emulator to play PS1 games on PC and literally it is the most successful emulator of PS1. ePSXe supports almost all PS1 games and it can be run at low hardware configuration PC. But the default graphics emulated by ePSXe are not so fine. We can retouch PS1 graphics delivered by ePSXe using smart shaders.

How to use shaders in ePSXe

Though ePSXe requires no graphics card to play PS1 games on PC but it is must if we want to apply shaders for PS1 games. We require Pete’s OpenGL Driver 2.9 ePSXe video plugin to enable shaders effect in PS1 games.

  • First download Pete’s OpenGL Driver 2.9 plugin Download link
  • Move the downloaded  plugin to the plugin folder of ePSXe
  • Now download shaders from here Download link
  • Create a folder named shaders in Plugin folder and paste all shaders there
  • Now open ePSXe emulator and go to option config > Video > Pete’s OpenGL Driver 2.9 > Configure
  • On configuration screen you will see the option shaders as shown in figure

shaders

  • Select this option and set the shaders directory and Select your favorite shader here
  • Now you will feel quite new and advanced look for your PS1 games

Note: To use shaders you must have a good graphics card in your PC

4 Best Emulators to Play PlayStation1 Games on PC

Gaming emulator is a software which can virtually work like console gaming machine such as PlayStation,Nintendo etc. Developers are working smartly on gaming PC emulators and these emulators are improving day by day. Literally PlayStation 1 emulators are most successful if we talk about all gaming platforms. We can play PS1(PSX) games without a graphics card on PC.

psx-games-windows

Below are the best 4 PC emulators to play PSX games.

ePSXe

It is the best working PlayStation 1 emulator. It is a free emulator and can run most of PS1 games. Its configuration is easy and you can configure it by its separate configuration utility. It have fully customizable game controller and also supported by PC USB gamepads.

pSX Emulator

It is another very good working PSX emulator. It can emulate many games but not all games. Your monitor must be configured on 32bit to use this emulator otherwise it will not work. You can play game using PC gamepads.

Download

Adril-PSX

Adril-PSX is a cool working emulator after ePSXe and its user interface is very attractive with a lot of configuration options. It works without using any plugin. Use the latest version of DirectX to use properly this emulator. It supports PC USB joysticks.

Download

Connectix Virtual Game Station

It is a fantastic emulator to play PSX games on PC. Formerly it was developed to play games on Windows 98 but later its Windows XP patch released to make it compatible for XP. This emulator is not free and you can use its DEMO to give a try.

Try them out and if you are aware of more emulator then do share with us.

Playing High Detail PC Games Without a Graphics Card

It sounds bit odd but really a software  exists which works like a real graphics card and can emulate video memory to play high detail pc games. While surfing cyber world I found a wonderful tool which works as a virtual graphics card but I did not believe on the story and decided it to test on my PC. I  unplugged my real graphics card in my Pc which was already installed and install this virtual graphics card and I find it really working. However it does not support all games but I have tested it on Alarm for Cobra Nitro.

How it Works

3D Analyze a utility which is capable in producing video memory and it uses your PC RAM for it. Suppose you have physical memory of 1GB then it converts a part of it to video memory. Currently it can emulate Nvidia TI 4600 and NVIDIA FX 5900 ,Ati Radeon 8500 and Ati Radeon 9800 Pro .

  • After opening the program you will see many options. First you have to select the exe file of that game you want to run.
  • Then see the option vendor ID and device ID
  • Here enter the vendor ID and device ID of any of the given graphic cards i.e. if you want to emulate the Ti 4600 then enter its ID.
  • Below is the configuration of 3D Analyze virtual Graphics Card

virtual-graphics-cardDownload link

3D Analyze may be a good alternative of real graphics card for gamers it is free so why not you try this before buying an expensive graphics card.